HIBALDSTOW CARRS [Hibaldstow Bridge (TA004015)]

Hibaldstow Carrs are a place of familiarity and memory for the author; until the age of eight he lived in the village that is set slightly above the floodplain on the limestone dip slope of the Lincolnshire Heights. In the 1950s the riverbank was still a place of village recreation; here he played and went fishing with his uncles. And here too members of his family lived and worked – in a farm now demolished, on the water’s edge close to the abutments of the long-disappeared Minnit’s bridge.

Recommended routes for walking:
Hibaldstow Bridge (TA004015) to Cadney Bridge (TA001028) and return (2.5 miles)
Hibaldstow Bridge (TA004015) to Minnit’s Bridge remains (TF008997) and return (3 miles)

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In creating the Hibaldstow audio work we would like to thank the following interviewees:

  • Professor John Barrett (archaeologist)
  • Henry Coulson (farmer)
  • Margaret Coulson (organist)
  • Cliff Ellis (farmer)
  • Peter and Sheila Gilbert (family members)
  • Kath M. Hall (family member, farmer)
  • Pat Horton (local historian)
  • Members of the Hibaldstow Parish Map Group: Norman and Kath Hall, Pat and Brian Borrill, Lesley Williamson

Responsibility for all textual content, composition and tone resides solely with the author.

Download the audio files:

To download, right click on the audio file you're interested in and choose 'Save link as'. Each file is approximately 15 minutes long (10Mb, .mp3 format). A normal click will open and play the file in your web browser.

Carrlands is supported by:Arts and Humanities Research Council

University College of Wales Aberystwyth

Landscape and Environment